AmericasDentistsGotTalent-forFixingDamagedorMissingTeeth

A recent episode of “America’s Got Talent” featured an engaging 93-year-old strongman called The Mighty Atom Jr. The mature muscleman’s stunt: moving a full-sized car (laden with his octogenarian “kid brother,” his brother’s wife, plus Atom’s “lady friend”) using just his teeth. Grinning for host Howie Mandel, Atom proudly told the TV audience that his teeth were all his own; then he grasped a leather strap in his mouth, and successfully pulled the car from a standstill.

We’re pleased to see that the Atom has kept his natural teeth in good shape: He must have found time for brushing and flossing in between stunts. Needless to say, his “talent” isn’t one we’d recommend trying at home. But aside from pulling vehicles, teeth can also be chipped or fractured by more mundane (yet still risky) activities — playing sports, nibbling on pencils, or biting too hard on ice. What can you do if that happens to your teeth?

Fortunately, we have a number of ways to repair cracked or chipped teeth. One of the easiest and fastest is cosmetic bonding with tooth-colored resins. Bonding can be used to fill in small chips, cracks and discolorations in the teeth. The bonding material is a high-tech mixture of plastic and glass components that’s extremely lifelike, and can last for several years. Plus, it’s a procedure that can be done right in the office, with minimal preparation or discomfort. However, it may not be suitable for larger chips, and it isn’t the longest-lasting type of restoration.

When more of the tooth structure is missing, a crown (or cap) might be needed to restore the tooth’s appearance and function. This involves creating a replacement for the entire visible part of the tooth in a dental lab — or in some cases, right in the office. It typically involves making a model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors, then fabricating a replica, which will fit perfectly into the bite. Finally, the replacement crown is permanently cemented to the damaged tooth. A crown replacement can last for many years if the tooth’s roots are in good shape. But what if the roots have been dislodged?

In some cases it’s possible to re-implant a tooth that has been knocked out — especially if it has been carefully preserved, and receives immediate professional attention. But if a tooth can’t be saved (due to a deeply fractured root, for example) a dental implant offers today’s best option for tooth replacement. This procedure has a success rate of over 95 percent, and gives you a natural looking replacement tooth that can last for the rest of your life.

So what have we learned? If you take care of your teeth, like strongman Atom, they can last a long time — but if you need to move your car, go get the keys.

If you would like more information about tooth restoration, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Randall Oaks Dental
March 09, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
The3TopIngredientsThatMakeYourToothpasteaSuperPlaqueBuster

Human beings have known for millennia the importance of keeping teeth clean. Although we've only come to more fully understand dental plaque's role in dental disease in the last century, our ancestors seemed to know instinctively this gritty biofilm on teeth had to go.

People from the past once used a variety of substances like ground oyster shells or leftover fire ashes to remove plaque from their teeth. Today, most of the world has replaced these substances with toothpaste, a mainstay of daily oral hygiene.

So, why is toothpaste better than other substances used in the ancient past? Besides the many other ingredients found in the typical tube of toothpaste, here are the top 3 that make it the ultimate tooth cleaner.

Abrasives. While your toothbrush does most of the mechanical work loosening plaque, toothpaste has ingredients called abrasives that give an added boost to your brushing action. The ideal abrasive is strong enough to remove plaque, but not enough to damage tooth enamel. If you look at your toothpaste's ingredient list, you'll probably see an abrasive like hydrated silica (made from sand), hydrated alumina, calcium carbonate or dicalcium phosphates.

Detergents. Your toothpaste's foaming action is a sign of a detergent, which helps loosen and break down non-soluble (not dissolvable with plain water) food substances. While similar to what you may use to wash your clothes or dishes, toothpaste detergents are much milder, the most common being sodium lauryl sulfate found in many cosmetic items. If you have frequent canker sores, though, sodium lauryl sulfate can cause irritation, so look for a toothpaste with a different detergent.

Fluoride. The enamel strengthening power of fluoride was one of the greatest discoveries in dental care history. Although not all toothpastes contain it, choosing one with fluoride can improve your enamel health and help protect you from tooth decay.

These and other ingredients like binders, preservatives and flavorings, all go in to make toothpaste the teeth-cleaning, disease-fighting product we've all come to depend upon. Used as part of daily oral hygiene, toothpaste can help brighten and freshen your smile, and keep your teeth and gums healthy.

If you would like more information on using the right toothpaste, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Toothpaste: What's in It?

By Randall Oaks Dental
March 06, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental crowns  

If you're concerned about the health of a tooth which is cracked, decayed or otherwise unhealthy, a dental crown from Dr. Dan Adamo at dental crownsRandall Oaks Dental in Carpentersville may be your treatment of choice. Crafted with high-grade, lifelike ceramic, your new crown can support and protect your tooth.

Improve many aspects of your dental health

A dental crown, or cap, improves the appearance, health and function of an ailing tooth as it replaces damaged enamel above the gum line. Some teeth which need crowns are simply decayed or have many fillings.

To see if a dental crown would help you, your Carpentersville dentist will inspect your tooth and X-ray it. Then, Dr. Adamo will take oral impressions which help the dental lab custom-craft and color your crown.

To accept a crown, your tooth must be reworked in shape and size to remove flawed enamel and so it fits together with the finished restoration. You'll wear a temporary cap over the prepared tooth while your new permanent crown is made at the lab. At your final appointment at Randall Oaks Dental, you'll receive your new crown, firmly cemented in place with a strong, permanent adhesive.

Besides capping a single tooth, a crown can cover a dental implant, today's best tooth replacement choice. If a patient needs a conventional bridge to span a smile gap, Dr. Adamo will use crowns on either side of the prosthetic to anchor it to natural teeth.

Preserving your crown

Care for your new crown with twice daily brushing and once daily flossing to keep crown margins plaque-free. Watch what you eat so you do not crack your crown or dislodge it. If you grind your teeth, a bite guard may be recommended.

Come see us

At Randall Oaks Dental, we love to see our patients smile with good health and self-confidence. To learn if a crown could help your smile, call our office for an appointment: (224) 484-8221.

By Randall Oaks Dental
February 27, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

 

Dental Implants Smile

From advanced gum disease to a car accident, there are many reasons an adult may end up losing one or more permanent teeth. While we know that this issue can be damaging to your appearance and your oral health, our Carpentersville, IL, dentist Dr. Dan Adamo is here to help restore your smile with the help of dental implants.

What is a dental implant?

While a dental implant is composed of three different parts, the main part is the implant itself, which is a small titanium post that is placed into the jawbone to replace your missing tooth’s roots.

The implant itself won’t be visible. It will stay within the jawbone and provide a fixed foundation from which to support a false tooth or even multiple teeth. That’s right; even if you are missing an entire row of teeth, implants can still give you your smile back, as they can also support a dental bridge or even full dentures.

Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

Most healthy adults are great candidates for implants. To find out whether or not implants are right for you, you’ll need to sit down with our Carpentersville, IL, restorative dentist for a consultation.

During the consultation, we will examine your teeth and take X-rays to make sure that the jawbone is healthy enough to support the implant and that you aren’t dealing with other oral health problems that could affect the treatment process.

Randall Oaks Dental in Carpentersville, IL, wants you to know that no matter what issues you are facing its dental team is here to help you improve your oral health and your appearance. If you are interested in learning more about dental implants then call us today.

NotJazzedAboutWearingBracesConsiderClearAlignersInstead

Wearing orthodontic braces brings challenges to daily life. During treatment a patient will need to avoid certain foods and habits, take more time to brush and floss properly, and may endure occasional discomfort. But the effect of metal braces on appearance can be especially difficult, especially for peer-conscious teens.

Clear aligners, though, offer an alternative to braces that could make some of these challenges easier, particularly with your appearance. Aligners are clear plastic trays that fit over the teeth to move them. They can be removed by the wearer for easier brushing and flossing or for special occasions. Best of all, they're much less noticeable than metal braces.

Clear aligners were developed thanks to advances in digital technology. An orthodontist uses a computer application incorporating the data from photographs, x-rays or CT scans of a patient's teeth and jaws to produce a series of clear plastic trays. The patient then wears each tray for about two weeks before changing to the next tray in the sequence.

The trays apply pressure much like metal braces to gradually move teeth to the desired position on the jaw. Each tray is slightly smaller in size than the previous tray in the sequence, so that the progression of tooth movement continues with each succeeding tray. The treatment time is about the same as with conventional braces.

This new orthodontic tool works well for many common bite problems, but until recently they've been limited in scope. But new designs in trays and attachments called buttons added to teeth to provide more leverage have greatly increased their use for more complex bite issues.

Clear aligners also have one other disadvantage, ironically due to one of their principal benefits, removability. Although they can be taken out, they must be worn consistently to achieve results. Some younger patients may not have the maturity level and discipline to responsibly wear their aligners as they should.

That's one issue you'll need to discuss with your orthodontist if you're considering clear aligners for your teen. But if they can maintain wearing consistency, and they have a bite problem that can be corrected with aligners, both you and your teen may find this choice more agreeable and attractive than braces.

If you would like more information on clear aligners, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Clear Aligners for Teens.”





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