Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Randall Oaks Dental
April 18, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: bonded retainer  
ABondedRetainerMightbeaBetterChoiceAfterBraces

The braces are finally off! But to keep your new, straighter smile you'll need to wear a retainer for some time. That's because the same structural mechanism used to move your teeth could undo what we've just accomplished.

That mechanism resides in an elastic tissue called the periodontal ligament that lies between the teeth and the bone and attaches to both with tiny fibers. While the ligament holds the teeth securely in place, it also allows for slight movement in response to bite changes. Braces "pull" the teeth in the desired new direction, and the ligament responds.

But with that pressure gone after the braces' removal, a kind of "muscle memory" can set in that moves the teeth back towards their original positions. A retainer, a dental appliance worn on the teeth, exerts just enough pressure to "retain" or keep the teeth from regressing.

Retainers are effective, but the most common type has a feature that poses potential problems: it can be removed by the wearer. Because of this, less disciplined patients might be tempted not to wear their retainer as directed. There's also a higher risk of losing one and incurring additional cost to replace it.

But there is another type, the bonded retainer, which stays permanently in the mouth until removed by an orthodontist. It's composed of a thin piece of metal that's firmly attached to the back of the teeth with dental composite material. Not only does a bonded retainer solve the problems mentioned before, it also can't be seen from the outside like a removable retainer.

A bonded retainer does have one disadvantage: because it can't be removed, it can obstruct the teeth during brushing and flossing and require more effort. You won't have as much difficulty with a removable retainer keeping teeth and gums clean. You can overcome this disadvantage, though, with specialized tools like a water flosser or a floss threader to make hygiene easier.

To choose which type of retainer is best for you or your family member, have a talk with your orthodontist. And if you choose a bonded retainer and later have it removed, be sure to switch immediately to a removable one if your orthodontist advises. With either retainer, you'll be able to preserve that hard-earned smile for years to come.

If you would like more information on bonded retainers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bonded Retainers: What are the Pros and Cons.”

By Randall Oaks Dental
April 08, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth decay  
YourSinusInfectionMightbeaSignofaToothProblem

Each year thousands of people develop sinus infections from various causes. But there's one cause for sinusitis that might surprise you—tooth decay.

Tooth decay begins when the acid produced by oral bacteria erodes a tooth's enamel protection to create a small hole or cavity. Left untreated, the infection can move into the inner pulp of the tooth and tiny passageways leading to the roots called root canals. The decay can then infect and break down the structure of the supporting jawbone.

This could affect the sinus cavities, hollow air-filled spaces in the upper portion of the face. The maxillary sinus in particular sits behind the cheek bones just above the upper jaw. Tooth roots, particularly in back teeth, can extend quite near or even poke through the floor of the maxillary sinus.

If decay affects these roots, the bone beneath this floor may begin to break down and allow the bacterial infection to enter the sinus. We call this particular kind of sinus infection maxillary sinusitis of endodontic origin (MSEO), "endodontic" referring to the interior structure of teeth.

While advanced decay can show symptoms like pain or sensitivity with certain hot or cold foods, it's also possible to have it and not know it directly. But a recurring sinus infection could be an indirect indication that the root of your suffering is a deeply decayed tooth. Treating the sinus infection with antibiotics won't cure this underlying dental problem. For that you'll need to see a dentist or an endodontist, a specialist for interior tooth issues.

The most common way to treat deep tooth decay is with root canal therapy. In this procedure, the dentist enters the decayed tooth's pulp (nerve chamber) and root canals and removes the diseased tissue. They will then fill the empty pulp and root canals with a special filling and seal the tooth to prevent future infection. The procedure stops the infection and saves the tooth—and if you have MSEO, it eliminates the cause of the sinus infection.

So, if you're suffering from chronic sinus infections, you might talk with your dentist about the possibility of a tooth infection. A thorough examination might reveal a decayed tooth in need of treatment.

If you would like more information on how dental problems can affect your overall health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

AmericasDentistsGotTalent-forFixingDamagedorMissingTeeth

A recent episode of “America’s Got Talent” featured an engaging 93-year-old strongman called The Mighty Atom Jr. The mature muscleman’s stunt: moving a full-sized car (laden with his octogenarian “kid brother,” his brother’s wife, plus Atom’s “lady friend”) using just his teeth. Grinning for host Howie Mandel, Atom proudly told the TV audience that his teeth were all his own; then he grasped a leather strap in his mouth, and successfully pulled the car from a standstill.

We’re pleased to see that the Atom has kept his natural teeth in good shape: He must have found time for brushing and flossing in between stunts. Needless to say, his “talent” isn’t one we’d recommend trying at home. But aside from pulling vehicles, teeth can also be chipped or fractured by more mundane (yet still risky) activities — playing sports, nibbling on pencils, or biting too hard on ice. What can you do if that happens to your teeth?

Fortunately, we have a number of ways to repair cracked or chipped teeth. One of the easiest and fastest is cosmetic bonding with tooth-colored resins. Bonding can be used to fill in small chips, cracks and discolorations in the teeth. The bonding material is a high-tech mixture of plastic and glass components that’s extremely lifelike, and can last for several years. Plus, it’s a procedure that can be done right in the office, with minimal preparation or discomfort. However, it may not be suitable for larger chips, and it isn’t the longest-lasting type of restoration.

When more of the tooth structure is missing, a crown (or cap) might be needed to restore the tooth’s appearance and function. This involves creating a replacement for the entire visible part of the tooth in a dental lab — or in some cases, right in the office. It typically involves making a model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors, then fabricating a replica, which will fit perfectly into the bite. Finally, the replacement crown is permanently cemented to the damaged tooth. A crown replacement can last for many years if the tooth’s roots are in good shape. But what if the roots have been dislodged?

In some cases it’s possible to re-implant a tooth that has been knocked out — especially if it has been carefully preserved, and receives immediate professional attention. But if a tooth can’t be saved (due to a deeply fractured root, for example) a dental implant offers today’s best option for tooth replacement. This procedure has a success rate of over 95 percent, and gives you a natural looking replacement tooth that can last for the rest of your life.

So what have we learned? If you take care of your teeth, like strongman Atom, they can last a long time — but if you need to move your car, go get the keys.

If you would like more information about tooth restoration, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Randall Oaks Dental
March 06, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental crowns  

If you're concerned about the health of a tooth which is cracked, decayed or otherwise unhealthy, a dental crown from Dr. Dan Adamo at dental crownsRandall Oaks Dental in Carpentersville may be your treatment of choice. Crafted with high-grade, lifelike ceramic, your new crown can support and protect your tooth.

Improve many aspects of your dental health

A dental crown, or cap, improves the appearance, health and function of an ailing tooth as it replaces damaged enamel above the gum line. Some teeth which need crowns are simply decayed or have many fillings.

To see if a dental crown would help you, your Carpentersville dentist will inspect your tooth and X-ray it. Then, Dr. Adamo will take oral impressions which help the dental lab custom-craft and color your crown.

To accept a crown, your tooth must be reworked in shape and size to remove flawed enamel and so it fits together with the finished restoration. You'll wear a temporary cap over the prepared tooth while your new permanent crown is made at the lab. At your final appointment at Randall Oaks Dental, you'll receive your new crown, firmly cemented in place with a strong, permanent adhesive.

Besides capping a single tooth, a crown can cover a dental implant, today's best tooth replacement choice. If a patient needs a conventional bridge to span a smile gap, Dr. Adamo will use crowns on either side of the prosthetic to anchor it to natural teeth.

Preserving your crown

Care for your new crown with twice daily brushing and once daily flossing to keep crown margins plaque-free. Watch what you eat so you do not crack your crown or dislodge it. If you grind your teeth, a bite guard may be recommended.

Come see us

At Randall Oaks Dental, we love to see our patients smile with good health and self-confidence. To learn if a crown could help your smile, call our office for an appointment: (224) 484-8221.

By Randall Oaks Dental
February 27, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

 

Dental Implants Smile

From advanced gum disease to a car accident, there are many reasons an adult may end up losing one or more permanent teeth. While we know that this issue can be damaging to your appearance and your oral health, our Carpentersville, IL, dentist Dr. Dan Adamo is here to help restore your smile with the help of dental implants.

What is a dental implant?

While a dental implant is composed of three different parts, the main part is the implant itself, which is a small titanium post that is placed into the jawbone to replace your missing tooth’s roots.

The implant itself won’t be visible. It will stay within the jawbone and provide a fixed foundation from which to support a false tooth or even multiple teeth. That’s right; even if you are missing an entire row of teeth, implants can still give you your smile back, as they can also support a dental bridge or even full dentures.

Am I a good candidate for dental implants?

Most healthy adults are great candidates for implants. To find out whether or not implants are right for you, you’ll need to sit down with our Carpentersville, IL, restorative dentist for a consultation.

During the consultation, we will examine your teeth and take X-rays to make sure that the jawbone is healthy enough to support the implant and that you aren’t dealing with other oral health problems that could affect the treatment process.

Randall Oaks Dental in Carpentersville, IL, wants you to know that no matter what issues you are facing its dental team is here to help you improve your oral health and your appearance. If you are interested in learning more about dental implants then call us today.